Artist and Designer Fair in Buxton

I’m delighted to be exhibiting at the newly renovated Octagon Hall in the Artist and Designer Fair on Saturday and  Sunday 20th and 21st October,  10am til 4.30pm.    An elegant and spacious venue, the Octagon Hall has room for upwards of 30 exhibitors.  Exhibitions include art, jewellery, furniture, glassware and other designer led products.  The renovations on the the Octagon Hall, part of the Pavilion Gardens, were completed earlier this month. It’s a stunning venue situated in 23 acres of award-winning Victorian Gardens where you can take a gentle stroll amongst the autumn leaves and then rest, relax and recruit your energies with something to eat and drink in one of numerous cafes and tea rooms.

oznor
The Pavilion Gardens

I will have a selection of new work with me completed in the last few weeks, where I have been continuing to explore colour and form in abstraction. My work and inspiration is about the archaeology of place and experience.

As the end of October approaches I’m thinking about something for the early Christmas shoppers so I will have  a selection of smaller works, prints and my quality boxed notecards available, as these items make unique and individual Christmas presents.

The weather forecast is good with sunshine predicted on Saturday, so why not drop in and take a look around.  I’d love to chat to you about my work, workshops and coaching.

How to support your artist mindset.

davBelief in Ourselves, or Believing Ourselves.

Do you have belief in yourself? Or, do you believe yourself when you are repeating some unhelpful or critical inner dialogue?  This post is one of a number I will be writing over the next few weeks on how to support your artist mindset.

I’m a member of a few art groups on social media. I have been noticing quite a few conversations about how people experience themselves in making their art. People post about their successes and also their struggles. Often the struggles seem to be about mindset. What I mean by this is anxiety about the work, what people might think, fear of success, risk taking or being seen are just a few examples of how our personal psychology can interfere with the process of art making with ease.

Psychology and Art

As a qualified psychotherapist in my other work I’ve long thought how important personal psychology is in making satisfying and authentic art.  Part of the training to be a therapist means years of personal therapy. As a result I think I know myself pretty well these days, and I have been able to work through a lot of my insecurity, self limiting beliefs and confidence issues over the years. When I first started painting I was struck, and I continue to be struck, by how important the psychological process of art making is in making authentic work.  I think because the experience of art making is deeply personal and revealing of self the experience of art-making intensifies and heightens our psychology in ways that other types of activity doesn’t.

Believing Ourselves: The Unhelpful Mindset and How to Work With It.

Fear and anxiety: Fear and anxiety are such common experiences for people. In our evolution they were responses to danger and to keep us safe. In modern living we often have this response to more everyday activities. One of the common patterns of thinking and feeling in anxiety states is to overestimate the “danger” or impact of the things we are feeling anxious about and to underestimate our capacity to cope with it. Therefore some simple reality testing is a very helpful way of reducing anxiety. By reality testing I quite literally mean checking the basis – the evidence – for the fears and anxieties we hold. This is a cognitive approach where engaging our thinking in a positive and self supporting way can assist in assessing the action or activity we are anxious or nervous about. Taking regular time to relax and de-stress is also very important as this will make us generally less susceptible to an anxious response.

Comparing to others: When we compare ourselves others we can diminish ourselves . Finding something in another person’s work we like or are inspired by is very different to making ourselves not ok in some way because we think we are not as good as the other. It’s useful to check in with ourselves when we are making comparisons. To ask ourselves the question – am I inspired or am I making myself less.

Unrealistic expectations: having unrealistic expectations or seeking perfection are ways that we can be not support ourselves. The trouble with unrealistic expectations or perfectionism is that we can set the goal so high that we never actually begin. Or we get so lost in the process of trying to be perfect that we lose contact with the overall aim of what we originally set out to do. Sometimes good enough is the thing to focus on.

Critical inner dialogue: listening to the critical inner voice. Our inner critic can be loud sometimes. Whilst sometimes well-intentioned (See my post for more on this) our inner critic may hold us back . Working out an effective strategy to deal with your internal critic is another useful positive artist mindset approach.

Self limiting beliefs: beginning a process of recognising what beliefs you hold that are unhelpful is an important step in self awareness. Knowing your learning edges and how to work with the aspects of your psychology that have the potential to hold you back is another aspect to consider. Self limiting beliefs can be across a whole range of areas. Here are some examples I have come across in my therapy and coaching work. It’s not ok to be a success, to think for oneself , to have feelings, to be important, to be creative, to belong, to be seen. These beliefs can hinder us in many unseen and unexpected ways. Once we know they are there we can be more active on our own behalf in ensuring they do not derail us from our goals and set about changing and updating them to positive attributions.

Belief in Ourselves: Self Supporting Mindset.

A self supporting mindset is as much about knowing ourselves, our edges and limits and how to work with them as it is about changing aspects of self.

Confidence: Confidence helps us to risk, experiment and play. Whether this in the making of our art, in the selling and promoting of our art. Developing ways of building confidence is hugely important. An immediate and simple suggestion is to keep a journal, or record in a way which suits you, of every success so that you begin to account your achievements. This is one way of supporting your confidence, and when you feel uncertain read it to boost your confidence remind yourself of the positive evidence of success.

Self knowledge: knowing ourselves, our learning edges, strengths and how to self support. Self knowledge helps us to recognise what might be difficult. What are the things that might hold us back. Once we have this knowledge we can take action on our own behalf and make arrangements, maybe support or resources to help us get what we want.

Vulnerability: being willing to be vulnerable with ourselves and others. We are more likely to have support if we can be open and honest about what we need, where our learning edges are and the things we need help with.

Responsiveness: paying attention to ourselves and what we need to support ourselves. Then taking action, being responsive to ourselves by problem solving.

Potency: being potent on our own behalf. Different to power which can be misused potency may mean doing things with energy and vigour. Being effective and resourceful. It might also mean keeping agreements and commitments with ourselves and others. Holding our integrity.

These are some of the ideas I’ve found helpful in my own personal development and that I use in coaching. What have you found helpful in supporting your artist mindset?

Interested in learning more about my coaching? Contact me to arrange for a free 20 minute chemistry check. Or want to meet me to chat about these ideas?  My next exhibition is at the Octagon Centre, Pavilion Gardens, Buxton,  on Saturday and Sunday 20th and 21st October.

Contact me to book a chemistry check.

Colour, Collage and Texture Workshop

Icefloe
Icefloe. mixed media. 12×12″. Board,. Framed.

This post is to introduce my new Colour, Collage and Texture Workshop which i am excited to be running next year.  This workshop is all about painting abstractly and using colour, collage and texture in the work to create impact.

It is a follow on session to my introductory session into Abstract Painting.  For people who have attended that day this new workshop builds on the material learnt in that session. If you are already painting abstractly then this session can help you bring further refinement to your work and develop the impact of what you are painting.

Colour Theory

The focus of the day is two fold. To demonstrate and teach a range of techniques using texture and collage that can be incorporated into abstract work. To look at some of the main ideas in colour theory and then to think about how to use those ideas to create more impact in your work.

Specifically, we will take a look at how to use colour through value as well as ideas about colour harmony and working with complementary colour.  I will go over the principles of the colour wheel and some basics in colour theory.  We will spend some time on colour mixing exercises to help you understand the various properties of colour and how to use it effectively in your work.  We will also look at a range of techniques to build texture into your work along with how to make your own collage papers.

The day is at the Old House Studio outside Glossop in a beautiful location overlooking the Pennine Way.  There is a well equipped purpose-built studio with space for up to eight people.

Teaching Experience

I have been teaching adults for over 20 years in various capacities.

My teaching style is relaxed and informal and I teach from a place of facilitating you to find your own style of working.  I will demonstrate the techniques and work on my own painting during the session so that you can observe my application of the ideas taught. There is also lots of time for one to one input and coaching during the day.  If this sounds like something that might be of interest then book your place by using the form below.

 

Why Coaching – Five Reasons

I’m going to keep this pretty simple, I thought I would write a short post of my top 5 reasons why coaching can be useful and beneficial.

white and black laptop computer on brown wooden stool near pile books

Support

Art coaching can support us so we don’t feel alone or isolated, struggling without help. Even when the work is going well sometimes we can feel this way. A reality of artistic life is that artists can often spend large amounts of time on their own. Plus a common pattern for many people in general is not to ask for help. So, having regular time where support is focused on your goals and aspirations can be really useful in making progress. And, as we are supported we are no longer on our own.

Objective Feedback

Part of how I see the role of an art coach is to provide objective feedback . Sometimes we need someone who is not connected to us in the way that friends, colleagues or family may be, to give us feedback. Art coaching can offer feedback. That can be on patterns and behaviours we are doing. It can also be on things we are not doing. Of course this may not always be entirely comfortable, and it can be very useful to have our habits, perceptions and areas of development highlighted. What is key about this kind of art coaching feedback is that it is given with empathy and support and in the service of supporting the artist being coached, in meeting their goals.

We might not have all the information

Sometimes we might not have all the information, experience or there may be gaps in our skill set. This might be information around techniques, use of materials, artistic or creative processes. It might be about aspects of business. How to make use of social media for example, the best way to approach an art gallery. Or it might be about psychology – why we feel dissatisfied with our work, struggling to find our voice or anxious about what others might think of our work.

Another person who has travelled the path before us may have information that is useful to us, Art coaching can point us in the direction of resources we were not aware of. An artistic coach may have knowledge and skills we can draw on. Or be able to help us recognise where self-limiting beliefs are hampering our success.

Critique and Evaluation

An art coach can support to help us see our strengths and discover our learning edges. Too often we can be self critical which is not useful in evaluating work and deciding what to do next (see my post on the inner critic). Having someone alongside us to help with critique rather than criticism can help in the process of learning, exploring and finding our voice.

Coaching has an element of expertise about psychological goal setting and how to achieve our aims. Having access to theory about human nature can help us understand ourselves better, have a more effective relationship with ourselves so get what we need for ourselves.

pexels-photo-1266007

My approach to art coaching is based in Transactional Analysis. I have been working with people in the field of personal development for over 15 years. Sessions can be online or at my office in Buxton.

Interested in finding out more? Book in for a free 20 minute chemistry chat. A chance to find out about each other and whether we might work together.

100 Days of Learning

Some of you might remember that earlier this year I signed up for the 100 Day Project. I was intending to write about the experience and interestingly it’s taken me a while to get around to it. Some of the delay is due to being busy over the summer, but I also think that it has taken me a while to consolidate on my learning because there was so much to take from the experience.

I signed up in a fit of enthusiasm. Well, during the course of the 100 days or so that enthusiasm waxed and waned. What I can say for sure is how much I have learnt from the process.

Initially I was using some of the principles learnt from the online workshop I have been involved in, run by Nicholas Wilton from Art2life, that took place at the beginning of this year. My focus was mainly on what Nick calls design, or composition, and value. He highlights how important differences are in composition. Differences in size of mark, shape and value.

Abstract Collage

The project I decided on was to do a small abstract collage in my sketchbook. I was hoping to develop my art practice in two ways from deciding to make this my project. Firstly to use all my learning from the course and secondly to learn about using collage.

Day 1

Part of the process I found particularly helpful was to go back through my sketchbook and make notes as I was going along. Some were very just short, just a line of two, others much longer as I found my reflections led me deeper into thinking about my work.

Looking back over the sketchbook there was a clear development in the collages. I began with small pieces on individual sheets. This was the first day, a very simple collage. My notes were about needing more differences in the size of shape and value.

Bolder shapes

Some of my main learning was about how to use larger shapes, to be bolder in my compositions and through the daily practice I developed a range of shapes that were more random and unusual.

I also discovered how much l like to layer collage onto collage. I particularly like little bits peeking through giving a sense of surprise or mystery as to what lies beneath. In the image to the right you can see the use of layering along the bolder shapes. In this piece I was also making use of handmade collage papers along with bought in materials. I enjoyed the contrast.

Going over the edges.

Another technique I became interested in was to go outside the edges. To use a separate sheet for one part of the collage, to then mount that on a plain piece of paper and then to continue to develop the piece. Here’s an example. Looking closely, the lines are drawn over a central piece and extend to the page it is mounted on. The red shape also extends over the edge.

New Materials.

I was able to experiment with using new materials – large graphite sticks and fabric for example. I also made use of found objects. Some more successful than others. A paper post it note from the floor – not so successful. The ticket stub from a dinner and dance I attended – more successful.

What became obvious during the process has been the importance of continuing experimentation and play. I noticed that there is a part of me that had a secret fear that my creativity might dry up. That there is a finite well of ideas. However I can confidently say that just the opposite has proven to be the case. For example the collages where have collaged over the edges feels like it might be a new sort of format. I’m now thinking of how to translate this into a multiple layered larger piece. I’m not sure when this will happen in my larger work, but I think it will find a place.

During the 100 days I also did some slightly larger pieces of collaging as small complete pictures. These are now for sale in my Etsy Shop.

Meanwhile what next? Something of a rest I think. Will I do it again? As an intense period of learning that boosted my art it was invaluable so, yes, I probably will.

Did you take part? What was your experience? What was the biggest learning?

Interested in bringing some collage into your work? Then book onto my Colour, Collage and Texture in Abstract Painting Workshop.

Please leave a comment below.

Art Books

I love books and I’ve quite a few art books on my shelves. Some are almost encyclopaedias of techniques with different media. Others more inspirational – examples of other artist’s work I use when I want to think about new ways of developing my own style of painting.  My collection reflects my development as an artist, so I have books on impressionistic oil painting, landscape painting, working with acrylics, watercolours and finally developing abstract work. Here’s mixture of some of my favourites.

The books of techniques I have found helpful over the years are:

The Search Press Guide to Painting Techniques: a detailed book of techniques across a wide range of different media. Search press produce a good range of books that cover different techniques.

 

Compendium of Acrylic Painting Techniques: a rich source of ways and means of creating with acrylics is also excellent, particularly if you are new to acrylics and interested in learning more about all the many and varied ways you can use the paint.

 

 

Betty Edwards – a great writer and really helpful when it comes to understanding how to draw. Her book Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain is excellent.  She offers a very clear and effective process for representational drawing.  She’s also written a book on colour techniques  as well that is full of great exercises and ideas to help you understand about tone and hue.

Some of the books I have used for inspiration:

Experimental Landscapes in Watercolour by Anne Blockley.  Anne is a watercolourist and her book is full of glorious images of her work along with lots of suggestions and ideas for how to use watercolour. Her use of colour gorgeous.

 

Acrylic Colour Explorations by Chris Cozen. This is a book of Chris’ work along with  some of her students. Another lovely compendium of inspiring images that I’ve very much enjoyed leafing through.

 

 

And finally, Creating Abstract Art is a book  by Dean Nimmer.   Emeritus Professor, Dean Nimmer, is the former Chair of the Painting, Printmaking programs at Mass College of Art, where he taught from 1970 to 2004.  This book looks at the nature of intuitive painting is is a rich source of exercises and ideas for loosening up and getting in contact with our intuitive artist.

Do you have a favourite art book?  I’d love to hear your suggestion if so.

Interested in learning to paint with me?  My new workshop programme for next year is now available here.

 

 

 

 

Are we over?

I sometimes find myself standing in front of a painting thinking,  “Are we over?”

Artistic Process

A little like a relationship that is no longer working, with our art do we need to ask this question?   Are there times we have to decide that a painting is not working and move on from it.  Or can we persevere in the hope that it will come right in the end.  This is another post about artistic process and some thoughts on tenacity vs moving on.

Making Large Moves

I’d like to share a recent experience.  I had been working on a painting for about 12 weeks and frankly it was driving me nuts.  I have recently begun working in a series so it was not the only piece of work I was concentrating on.  I had another 6 pieces also in process which were going well.  However, with this piece I really felt like I was getting nowhere.    The painting had several versions, none of them particularly feeling satisfying to me.  During the course of painting  I had made several large moves, but none of them got me out of the frustrating,  getting nowhere process I was in. I don’t have photos from all of the various iterations, but here are a few with some of the moves I made.

Early stage

At this stage the piece had an emerging abstract landscape feel.  I was aware of needing to do a lot of work to the design as there were quite number of areas I felt required development and resolution.  The similar shapes along the top, the large dark that was drawing eye into the centre, too much saturated colour.  However there was some good texture building and I felt optimistic of where it was heading at this point.

Next stage

It felt like something interesting was beginning to emerge with more landscape forms although I was not convinced by the inclusion of a horizon line at this early stage as I felt it was constraining me and pushing me in a specific direction quite early on.  I next felt the need to move the piece forward more significantly so I did this.

Big move

Increasing Differences

I had at this point decided to take a risk and make a big dramatic change by  putting in a large orange shape.  It felt different, fresh and something new.  I liked the impact of the large shape and felt like I could resolve the design with the similarity of some the smaller blue and darker shapes along the bottom.  But, some time later it wasn’t happening.   I spent quite some time making alterations to the design wanting to increase the range of difference and contrast in the medium shapes but each move felt like it took me further away from a resolution.  .

 

Big moves

Sanding!

Next I included a large blue shape along the bottom but the darks still felt too similar and disconnected.  By this point I was losing patience.  I got out the sander and sanded the whole painting back which resulting in some interesting fresh marks and a very smooth board!  I rotated the painting and had something new to respond to.

These last two images are my final versions of this piece.  As you can see there was a lot more development but nothing that felt like a successful one.  By this point I think I was getting completely lost in frustration and feeling increasingly like I was not going to resolve this painting,  but would continue going around in circles.

It seemed like a good point to be asking the question am I done with this?

Moving on

I’m all for sticking with things and seeing them through to completion, however I also know there comes a point  where the energy invested is just not worth the outcome.  I’d reached that point with this board.  Time to move on.  So, I completely “wrecked” what was there and this is now sitting in a corner of my studio until I have gotten over the break up.  I’m not going back to it until I have completely different relationship with it  otherwise I think the previously process might reemerge. So, we are officially on a break!  I feel like I need to give it some time and space to move on in my process so that it doesn’t feel like returning to something I was struggling with.  I think by giving myself enough distance it will feel fresher.

Sharing the learning

Here are some of the things that helped me while I was stuck with this painting.

Definitely not being over invested in any aspect of the work. Several times I made big and risky moves, even thought they didn’t lead to a resolution it helps to feel free to play spontaneously.  See my previous post on Falling in Love too early  for more on this.

Recognising this is only a painting. Getting into a struggle and a fight with the work is probably getting into a fight with myself as I’m the one doing the painting.

The painting isn’t winning nor am I losing.  Holding on to the idea that the experience is one of learning can be self supporting. So I didn’t make a finished piece. I learnt a lot on the journey to where I am now.

Knowing when to take a break and that doing so is not about failure but a recognition of what the most helpful approach right now.

For now I shall continue to use it as a play board  – wiping paint on it periodically just make interesting marks and maybe this will be one of those relationships were we do get back together and make it work…….

Playboard
Play board

Any thoughts – is something that you have experienced as well?  What do you do when you get stuck in your art making?

If you’d like to chat to me about art making come and visit me at Art in the Pen in Skipton 10th to 12th of August.

Please do browse the site.  You’ll find prints and cards at my  Etsy Shop.  along with small originals and collages.

Falling in love?

Last night I fell in and out of love. With a painting.

Creativity

You may remember that I have recently completed a 12 week online art development programme (CVP) with  Nicholas Wilton, from Art2Life. One of his phrases about painting, and one that has stayed with me is  “Don’t fall in love too early”

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Too Early to Fall in Love.

What Nick was talking about is the inclination to get attached to parts of our art work in a way that stifles or stops our creativity. If we become overly invested in an idea, an aspect of the work, a corner with some lovely texture, paint marks etc then our creative exploration can be be halted.  I notice this in myself.  if there is section of a piece I am working that I really like I can get a bit precious and tight not wanting to inadvertently paint over something I love.  Then that tightness will often stop me exploring and creating freely.  And the work loses energy and can feel unexciting and habitual.

The impetus for this post was this painting. I was working on it a couple of evenings ago.  It was very early on in the process that the landscape forms began to emerge.  Possibly as early as the second pass so in the photograph it hasn’t had a lot of development and there isn’t a lot of history to it.   At this point my inclination was to stay with it pretty much as it stood.  This may also have been because it’s one of my first large pieces in this new series and with an exhibition coming at Art in the Pen in August I’m keen to keep on moving forward with pieces.

A day later as I was working on again and taking a moment sitting in front of it thinking what next?

Risk

I was noticing a lack of excitement in the painting  and found myself thinking “have I fallen in love too early?”  I was aware that it felt like there wasn’t anything new in this piece. So I started asking myself the question “Am I willing to risk what’s there and go in another direction not I knowing where the piece will develop.  How can I push this further? What would a risky move look like?

So, I took a risk, not as big as some but I did take some big moves in a new direction.  I took my used paper from my palette and pressed it onto the painting in a few places and I also introduced orange as a complementary colour to the blues which I think has resulted in a new feeling in the work, a new energy and vibrancy.

IMG_20180710_101625.jpg
In a long term relationship!

I’m much happier with this piece, in fact we are in a long term relationship!  There are a few more adjustments I will make to this before final finishing but the essence of the work is there for me now.

Is this process something that you recognise?  How do you deal with this your own art practice?

Abstract Landscape Workshop: what can you expect?

IMG_20180610_180428We’ll be spending the day together at a lovely venue, The Old House Studio in the middle of open countryside about 3  miles from Glossop.

We will begin with some simple ideas about how to compose abstract paintings, as well as spending half an hour looking at abstract work to get some ideas of why these works are successful.

To loosen up and get us in touch with landscape we will then spend an hour or two sketching and painting outside. The Old House Studio is ideally situated for this as it is overlooking part of the Pennine Way with stunning views up and down the valley. There is a useful terrace outside the main studio where we can assemble with all our gear, making it easy for us to paint outside without having to carry lots of materials with us.  The sketches will form a loose reference point for the paintings we will then go on to make.  We my even use some of the sketches later as collage materials if that is the direction the work takes.

IMG_20180610_180857Having connected to the scenes around us, we will move to beginning our final paintings.  For these we will be using wood panels as it allows us greater scope for creating surface texture.

We begin on a gessoed panel with intuitive play. Laying down paint in a free and spontaneous fashion to both cover the surface and provide an initial jumping off point into a more finished composition.

Finished with play,  we will begin to bring intention into the composition creating landscape forms and shapes.  I will be demonstrating how I make decisions in my painting and sharing my thinking with you.

Along the way I will demonstrate various techniques including how to use oil pastel, line, scratching, sanding and scraping paint, collage.

The workshop is for people with some previous experience of painting but this is not essential, and absolute beginners are welcome.

With a few places left,  if you are interested then please use the contact form below.

 

Open Arts: What a Scorcher!

Wasn’t it just?  Fabulous weather over the Bank Holiday weekend and a thoroughly successful show at Spring Bank Arts Centre in New Mills.

We had a steady stream of visitors over the three days and a wide variety of artists and IMG_20180528_101031makers for them to meet and talk to about their work. The raffle and cake sale raised over £200 for the centre to help support this great community initiative.

So who was there and if I missed it where can I see their work?

I took a selection of work that showed my development as an artist from some early impressionistic oil paintings through mixed media and to my most recent abstract work. The next opportunity to meet me and see what I have been up to will be at Art in the Pen at Skipton on the 11th and 12th of August. I also have a  limited number of tickets available for the preview evening on Friday 10th – email me if you would like one. First come first served!

Michela Griffith was exhibiting with a selection of prints from her creative photography.

Cath Dunn.  Cath paints watercolour and mixed media semi-abstract work inspired by the Peak District Landscape.

Howard Levitt was also an exhibitor. Howard is a professional artist and illustrator.

Our final artist and jeweller was Emma Sidwell.

Hannah Dodd was there with a selection of interesting textile work,  and ceramics from

Pentimento , the creative partnership of Jaki and Catherine who are based in Glossop.

Finally Adele Kime who not only brought a fabulous selection of her jewellery for sale but was also the main organiser for the group. Thanks Adele!

We had a great time, some pretty delicious cake, great coffee (felt like an early start for one or two of us) and met some lovely folks and sold some of our work.

Support for these kinds of events is invaluable for practising artists as we get to meet and begin to build relationships with people who may become collectors of our work in the future.  Even purchasing something small like a greetings card helps small business owners and artists to continue.   I’m reminded of the Just a Card campaign which was started with this aim.

Thanks to all who came along and for some great conversations and feedback, and finally, hope to see you again next year.

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