24 Hour Sale

Exciting News! I will be doing a Facebook Live Sale on Monday 10th December at 6.30pm. I will have some of my prints, my boxed notecards and even some original paintings in the sale. I am offering a 25% reduction on the usual price and P&P is included. The sale will last until 6.30pm (uk time) on Tuesday. With plenty of time for posting before Christmas this could be your opportunity to grab a pre-Christmas bargain and give an unusual and original gift to someone special.

I have a selection of abstract and impressionistic landscape prints that will be included in this 24 Hour Sale. I will be selecting from the recent colour studies and including some of these along with two of my larger works on wooden cradled panel. Along with prints and originals both my new Abstract and the Flowers and Fields card sets are included as smaller gift options.

Message me on the day to reserve your choice and items will be allocated on a first come first served basis.

Why Buy Original Art?

So, what is the point of buying an original piece of art? When you can probably get something much cheaper from (insert name of the home or furniture store of choice) and it can be changed as you update your paint colour.

I’d like to share a different perspective. Original art is not just for the investors. In fact I think the vast majority of original art is probably bought from established or up and coming artists like me and my fellow artists for tens or hundred of pounds, rather than thousands of pounds. Probably from small local galleries, local and regional art fairs, open studios and directly from the artists themselves.

What are you getting in buying a piece of original art? You have the opportunity to own something unique that is completely original. Not just that, in the creation of the piece the artist has had a relationship with that piece of work. They have applied the paint and materials or melted the metal, worked the clay, carved the wood, blown the glass. If you are buying directly from the artist you can often talk to them and find out about them.  Learn what inspired them, hear the story of the creation of the work and even why the artist made the choices they did in the making.  In owning the piece you are gifted with the unique experience of owning a creative representation of someone’s perspective on the world.

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Colour Study, mounted. £30 in my Etsy shop.

You can start small. Lots of artists will make their sketches or smaller works available for sale. These can be a great way to start your original art collection.  For example I have done a couple of projects this year in support of my art practice one was the 100 Day Challenge where I did a small abstract collage a day. This inspired some small collage works on paper.  The second was an exercise shared by Louise Fletcher which resulted in a whole host of small colour studies. These works are all available in my Etsy shop for under £40.  You might also like to check out Alice Sheridan’s recent post on this topic, Alice has some good tips about how to decide what to buy.

Choosing a piece of original art allows us to connect with our own inspiration and the things that move us.  We have the chance own original work that appeals to us deeply. Sometimes we will not know why we like something just that there is something about it that appeals to us.   We may not even be able to put it into words. I think these kind of experiences are worth having. To sit in front of a piece of art that brings you pleasure year after year, to be moved and inspired.

How did you begin collecting original art?  What was your first piece? Do you still love it?  I’d love to hear your experiences.

 

 

 

 

Build Your Confidence Challenge

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Are you thinking that you might be interested in building your confidence as an artist? In my experience confidence is often based on how we account what we are good at, how much our self-limiting beliefs and critical inner dialogue affects us, how we prioritise ourselves and our work, and how effective we are at getting the feedback we need to support ourselves. Building on my recent post about Supporting your Artist Mindset, with these things in mind I have devised a six week challenge with a question or task each week for you to consider, think and journal about and which you might find helpful in building more confidence. There is plenty of time between each email for the task and to reflect on the changes you are making.

I will be posting a series of questions or tasks each week for the next six weeks, taking a week off at Christmas. If you are interested, and to make sure you don’t miss a post, then sign up to my newsletter list here to ensure it comes directly to your inbox. The first email will come out after you sign up for the challenge.

And do let me know how you get on, I love to hear about people’s progress, learning and success. Have fun and happy painting.

Sign up for the 6 week email confidence boosting challenge.

Sticking to the knitting – or how to build an arts business

Copy of Copy of Anika Kohler (1)I wanted a comparable arty phrase but couldn’t come up with one, so sticking to the knitting it had to be.  What am I talking about?  Being focused and keeping with a plan, or how I have gone about building an arts business.

I’m an emerging artist.  I have been a painting for about eight years and intermittently showing my work for the last three or four years. I’ve sold some paintings and run some workshops.  I’ve had some very small success.

Early this year, as lots of you will know if you read my blog, I completed the Creative Visionary Path with Nicholas Wilton and  I found my artistic voice.  Which has been incredibly exciting.  As a result I also felt readier than I ever had to start putting myself out there, hopefully selling work and building a profile as an artist.

I had set up some decent support for myself with an occasional Virtual Assistant to help with admin,  I’ve just appointed a bookkeeper and although I have a sales and marketing background, I also have a marketing support person to bounce ideas off and to share the workload.

Very quickly I found myself with so many opportunities I could potentially pursue.  Because I’m already a therapist and teacher I could see the possibility to bring some of my teaching and psychological work into my art.  I could develop my art workshops and offer coaching for artists.

However,  it was during one of the conversations with Fiona (my marketing support) as I was considering these options that I realised needed a clear plan otherwise I could just get completely overwhelmed, run around doing nothing very effectively and end up feeling disheartened and demotivated with my lack of progress and success.

Screenshot_20181116-133955My focus was and is my art. I want to paint. Workshops and coaching are great and I love doing that kind of work. But for now because I am an emerging artist with, as yet, a fairly small audience of interested people I need to focus on making work.  Continuing on this path of exploring and developing my authentic voice, now that I have found it, and getting that work out into the public. I decided that people would be interested in my workshops and coaching organically from seeing my work, my posting on social media, and my writing and talking about art and creativity. So, that’s what I have been doing and it has been paying off.

Since completing CVP earlier this year I have held a pop up shop, exhibited at Derbyshire Open Arts, Art in the Pen at Skipton and twice in Buxton.

I have run two art workshops, demonstrated at a local art group and had a people begin coaching with me.

I have been invited to provide work to a gallery Number Four in St Abbs and applied and been invited to join Peak District Artisans.

I’m beginning next year’s planning and it will be similar to this year. I will be exhibiting at some key events in the local art calendar.   Derbyshire Open Arts, some of the Artist and Designer Fairs in Buxton, the Great Dome Art Fair.  The earliest chance next year to see my work will be at the Chatsworth Exhibition in the Stables from 10th January to 28th February 2019 with Peak District Artisans.

What else?  I am running two workshops this year focused on abstract art .  An Introduction to Abstract Art and, a follow on and more advanced day, Colour, Collage and Texture in Abstract Painting.  I’m open for more coaching work which can be online,  or in person in Buxton.

So this year has been all about sticking to the knitting, having a plan and seeing it through. I’m delighted with how it’s gone and I’m eager and looking forward to more.  Are there any “how to’s” from this?  Here’s my top five:

  1. Decide on what your focus needs to be, mine was making art and getting it out there.
  2. Develop a plan of activity to support your focus. In the main don’t do anything that takes you away from this.
  3. Delegate and outsource. If you can find someone to do a tasks either quicker or, at less than it costs you to do it yourself, then outsource.
  4. Follow up, follow up, follow up.  From little acorns etc. Make a note of every interaction that has potential and follow it up. If not now, then maybe at some point in the future.
  5. Recognise and celebrate every success.  You deserve it!

Has this year gone as you hoped?  What are your success stories? With hindsight would you have done anything different?

I’d love to hear from you and of course if you are around do drop into the Octagon in Buxton between Friday 23rd and Sunday the 25th November for a chat.  I will have lots of smaller works, prints and boxed notecards with me that make great Christmas gifts.

On Capacity and Connectedness

This post is about some discoveries about capacity and connectedness that emerged from a recent period of struggling to paint.

I’ve been having a tough few weeks. My art; often a refuge, delight and source of energy has not been going well. I have been feeling frustrated, irritable, comparing my work to others and feeling self critical. As a therapist and coach I recognise this as being in a defensive pattern because I am feeling vulnerable.  I am feeling vulnerable because there is a lot going on in my life at the moment, both good and not so great.  Across all areas of my work I have been very busy.  We have had really successful start to the year in my psychotherapy training business (TA Training Organisation).  In my art a new gallery,  Number Four Gallery in St Abbs, have taken eight pieces of work for their Christmas Show. I have been accepted to join Peak District Artisans. I exhibited at the local Artist and Designer Fair in Buxton.

However, in the midst of these positive events, there have also been some difficult things happening that are affecting me emotionally and psychologically. So I have retreated from myself and others in a protective way that is an old unhelpful pattern. Which brings me to the point of this post and the learning I’ve gained from this experience.

So, what is the learning I’m wanting to share?

Firstly about connection. If we are making authentic art this is an expression of part of self. Then it seems to follow if we are not fully connected to ourselves we will be disconnected from our art.  As I think back over the last couple of months this is what I have been experiencing.  In my art making, in the studio in front of the painting, I was going outwards to what others were doing and looking to repeat what I had already done, rather than looking inwards at what I felt inspired to do. My choice of colour, mark making and ways of painting were not what I truly felt in the moment because being disconnected from myself meant I was disconnected from what I felt.  How important it is then to our art making to stay connected to ourselves and the personal choices we want to make.

Secondly scaling up and scaling down.

During this period the only thing that felt “like me” were some colour studies I was working on.  Using an exercise from Louise Fletcher fellow artist, (see Louise in This Painting Life on Facebook) I had about 15 different small colour studies I was playing with. What I was noticing was that the bigger works (a couple of 20×20 inch paintings)  were not resolving themselves.  Again, on reflection, I can see that it was almost as though I didn’t have the capacity to do anything bigger.  That not only does making bigger work require us to scale up in terms of the tools,  materials and composition, it also requires us up to scale up in terms of our process as well.  Being able to hold and contain the experience of something bigger takes capacity.  For larger work to be successful it needs to feel integrated as a whole rather than something that is almost a collection of smaller works on a bigger canvas.  So in the process of making larger works the artist needs to have creative energetic capacity to conceptualise the whole.  Which is not about planning the outcome but more about having mental space and energy for the art-making process.

Are there any useful “how to’s” from this experience? Well for me a recognition that I have a busy life and so there will be times when I don’t have capacity for major works. When that happens it’s ok, and that art making can still happen, just on smaller scale. The “how to” from this is acceptance of personal limitations.

Does this tally with your experience of moving between larger and smaller works?  I’d love to hear how you maintain your connectedness?

All colour studies will be available to buy at my next exhibition in Buxton at the Pavilion Gardens on Friday 23rd, Saturday 24th adn Sunday 25th of November.

My Artist Journey

I enjoyed art at school. There, my main interest was ceramics. I would spend a lot of my breaks and lunchtime working in the pottery room as for me, it was a haven, as I didn’t particularly enjoy school. I came back to art about 9 years ago. I had completed my training to work as a psychotherapist and wanted something to help me relax and to be creative in a different way. I began with a basic course run as part of the local authority’s adult education programme. I had made a start towards something new. The course was pretty basic; however it got me touch with art materials again.

Landscape Oil Painting

An early oil painting.

The next significant moment was an oil painting workshop with Imogen Bone while I was holiday on the Isles of Scilly. Imogen is a good teacher and a modern impressionistic landscape painter. This was a transformative experience as I realised I could paint. I came back home all fired up and eager to continue exploring landscape painting in oils.

An early acrylic painting.

At the same time as painting I was visiting art galleries when I could, researching different artists I wanted to work with along with experimenting and trying new materials. The next two or three years saw considerable exploration. One of the best teachers I met was Carol Baker who runs a whole series of workshops on loosening up and working with acrylics. At this stage in my journey I was definitely still learning about the materials and how to paint in a loose representational style. I was pleased with my work and began to show it in a small way in open studios and a couple of small galleries/ cafes that took a few paintings. My relatives all got paintings for Christmas and I sold a few pieces.

Mixed Media and Abstract Painting

The exploration continued. I learnt about using watercolour. I found the work of Jean Haines and Ann Blockley. Their lovely books inspired me and I began to experiment with mixing media; at this stage mostly ink, watercolour, gouache. I had a tentative play with collage.

Exploring abstraction.

The next big thing was finding the work of Jane Davies, an American abstract artist on YouTube. Jane was my introduction to abstract work. She has a ton of free videos on her website and also offers a series of online courses. I signed up for a few of these and found them really helpful on learning yet more about mixing media with acrylics and abstract composition, a completely new direction. As I began to paint abstractly, I really began to feel and see that my work was derivative; my version of someone else’s style. This was something I struggled with for some time. Looking back I can see that up to this point my explorations had been mostly learning about materials and techniques. The area that I had not explored, probably because I was not yet ready to do so, was artistic process. How I go about making my art. Partly the things that inspire me, that I draw on in making my art. But also the process of making my art. What do I mean by this? I’m referring to how I begin, the steps from beginning through the making of the work. The decisions and choices I make during the process. How I complete and finish a piece.

Intuitive Painting

This brings me to Art2Life, Nicholas Wilton and Creative Visionary Path. This is a 12 week online development programme for artists. It was the big break though I needed. The course is a mixture of technical principles about how to make authentic work, and guidance and coaching on ways of understanding one’s own process in that making.

So I now know that my work is intuitive. I have no idea what is going to emerge when I begin to paint, it’s a process of play, exploration and response in the moment to what I am seeing and experiencing. Sometimes the work is about a memory, of landscape, a form or shape in nature or something created by people. Sometimes it is about the process of making. It’s an adventure and a journey that is continually exciting. What next? The exploration continues. I feel like I am at the beginning of a new phase. That while I’m confident I’ve found my form of artistic expression, I am now engaged in an ongoing process of change and development.

What were the big breakthroughs in your artistic journey? How did you find your voice?

I’d love to hear your stories.

Artist and Designer Fair in Buxton

I’m delighted to be exhibiting at the newly renovated Octagon Hall in the Artist and Designer Fair on Saturday and  Sunday 20th and 21st October,  10am til 4.30pm.    An elegant and spacious venue, the Octagon Hall has room for upwards of 30 exhibitors.  Exhibitions include art, jewellery, furniture, glassware and other designer led products.  The renovations on the the Octagon Hall, part of the Pavilion Gardens, were completed earlier this month. It’s a stunning venue situated in 23 acres of award-winning Victorian Gardens where you can take a gentle stroll amongst the autumn leaves and then rest, relax and recruit your energies with something to eat and drink in one of numerous cafes and tea rooms.

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The Pavilion Gardens

I will have a selection of new work with me completed in the last few weeks, where I have been continuing to explore colour and form in abstraction. My work and inspiration is about the archaeology of place and experience.

As the end of October approaches I’m thinking about something for the early Christmas shoppers so I will have  a selection of smaller works, prints and my quality boxed notecards available, as these items make unique and individual Christmas presents.

The weather forecast is good with sunshine predicted on Saturday, so why not drop in and take a look around.  I’d love to chat to you about my work, workshops and coaching.

How to support your artist mindset.

davBelief in Ourselves, or Believing Ourselves.

Do you have belief in yourself? Or, do you believe yourself when you are repeating some unhelpful or critical inner dialogue?  This post is one of a number I will be writing over the next few weeks on how to support your artist mindset.

I’m a member of a few art groups on social media. I have been noticing quite a few conversations about how people experience themselves in making their art. People post about their successes and also their struggles. Often the struggles seem to be about mindset. What I mean by this is anxiety about the work, what people might think, fear of success, risk taking or being seen are just a few examples of how our personal psychology can interfere with the process of art making with ease.

Psychology and Art

As a qualified psychotherapist in my other work I’ve long thought how important personal psychology is in making satisfying and authentic art.  Part of the training to be a therapist means years of personal therapy. As a result I think I know myself pretty well these days, and I have been able to work through a lot of my insecurity, self limiting beliefs and confidence issues over the years. When I first started painting I was struck, and I continue to be struck, by how important the psychological process of art making is in making authentic work.  I think because the experience of art making is deeply personal and revealing of self the experience of art-making intensifies and heightens our psychology in ways that other types of activity doesn’t.

Believing Ourselves: The Unhelpful Mindset and How to Work With It.

Fear and anxiety: Fear and anxiety are such common experiences for people. In our evolution they were responses to danger and to keep us safe. In modern living we often have this response to more everyday activities. One of the common patterns of thinking and feeling in anxiety states is to overestimate the “danger” or impact of the things we are feeling anxious about and to underestimate our capacity to cope with it. Therefore some simple reality testing is a very helpful way of reducing anxiety. By reality testing I quite literally mean checking the basis – the evidence – for the fears and anxieties we hold. This is a cognitive approach where engaging our thinking in a positive and self supporting way can assist in assessing the action or activity we are anxious or nervous about. Taking regular time to relax and de-stress is also very important as this will make us generally less susceptible to an anxious response.

Comparing to others: When we compare ourselves others we can diminish ourselves . Finding something in another person’s work we like or are inspired by is very different to making ourselves not ok in some way because we think we are not as good as the other. It’s useful to check in with ourselves when we are making comparisons. To ask ourselves the question – am I inspired or am I making myself less.

Unrealistic expectations: having unrealistic expectations or seeking perfection are ways that we can be not support ourselves. The trouble with unrealistic expectations or perfectionism is that we can set the goal so high that we never actually begin. Or we get so lost in the process of trying to be perfect that we lose contact with the overall aim of what we originally set out to do. Sometimes good enough is the thing to focus on.

Critical inner dialogue: listening to the critical inner voice. Our inner critic can be loud sometimes. Whilst sometimes well-intentioned (See my post for more on this) our inner critic may hold us back . Working out an effective strategy to deal with your internal critic is another useful positive artist mindset approach.

Self limiting beliefs: beginning a process of recognising what beliefs you hold that are unhelpful is an important step in self awareness. Knowing your learning edges and how to work with the aspects of your psychology that have the potential to hold you back is another aspect to consider. Self limiting beliefs can be across a whole range of areas. Here are some examples I have come across in my therapy and coaching work. It’s not ok to be a success, to think for oneself , to have feelings, to be important, to be creative, to belong, to be seen. These beliefs can hinder us in many unseen and unexpected ways. Once we know they are there we can be more active on our own behalf in ensuring they do not derail us from our goals and set about changing and updating them to positive attributions.

Belief in Ourselves: Self Supporting Mindset.

A self supporting mindset is as much about knowing ourselves, our edges and limits and how to work with them as it is about changing aspects of self.

Confidence: Confidence helps us to risk, experiment and play. Whether this in the making of our art, in the selling and promoting of our art. Developing ways of building confidence is hugely important. An immediate and simple suggestion is to keep a journal, or record in a way which suits you, of every success so that you begin to account your achievements. This is one way of supporting your confidence, and when you feel uncertain read it to boost your confidence remind yourself of the positive evidence of success.

Self knowledge: knowing ourselves, our learning edges, strengths and how to self support. Self knowledge helps us to recognise what might be difficult. What are the things that might hold us back. Once we have this knowledge we can take action on our own behalf and make arrangements, maybe support or resources to help us get what we want.

Vulnerability: being willing to be vulnerable with ourselves and others. We are more likely to have support if we can be open and honest about what we need, where our learning edges are and the things we need help with.

Responsiveness: paying attention to ourselves and what we need to support ourselves. Then taking action, being responsive to ourselves by problem solving.

Potency: being potent on our own behalf. Different to power which can be misused potency may mean doing things with energy and vigour. Being effective and resourceful. It might also mean keeping agreements and commitments with ourselves and others. Holding our integrity.

These are some of the ideas I’ve found helpful in my own personal development and that I use in coaching. What have you found helpful in supporting your artist mindset?

Interested in learning more about my coaching? Contact me to arrange for a free 20 minute chemistry check. Or want to meet me to chat about these ideas?  My next exhibition is at the Octagon Centre, Pavilion Gardens, Buxton,  on Saturday and Sunday 20th and 21st October.

Contact me to book a chemistry check.

Colour, Collage and Texture Workshop

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Icefloe. mixed media. 12×12″. Board,. Framed.

This post is to introduce my new Colour, Collage and Texture Workshop which i am excited to be running next year.  This workshop is all about painting abstractly and using colour, collage and texture in the work to create impact.

It is a follow on session to my introductory session into Abstract Painting.  For people who have attended that day this new workshop builds on the material learnt in that session. If you are already painting abstractly then this session can help you bring further refinement to your work and develop the impact of what you are painting.

Colour Theory

The focus of the day is two fold. To demonstrate and teach a range of techniques using texture and collage that can be incorporated into abstract work. To look at some of the main ideas in colour theory and then to think about how to use those ideas to create more impact in your work.

Specifically, we will take a look at how to use colour through value as well as ideas about colour harmony and working with complementary colour.  I will go over the principles of the colour wheel and some basics in colour theory.  We will spend some time on colour mixing exercises to help you understand the various properties of colour and how to use it effectively in your work.  We will also look at a range of techniques to build texture into your work along with how to make your own collage papers.

The day is at the Old House Studio outside Glossop in a beautiful location overlooking the Pennine Way.  There is a well equipped purpose-built studio with space for up to eight people.

Teaching Experience

I have been teaching adults for over 20 years in various capacities.

My teaching style is relaxed and informal and I teach from a place of facilitating you to find your own style of working.  I will demonstrate the techniques and work on my own painting during the session so that you can observe my application of the ideas taught. There is also lots of time for one to one input and coaching during the day.  If this sounds like something that might be of interest then book your place by using the form below.

 

Why Coaching – Five Reasons

I’m going to keep this pretty simple, I thought I would write a short post of my top 5 reasons why coaching can be useful and beneficial.

white and black laptop computer on brown wooden stool near pile books

Support

Art coaching can support us so we don’t feel alone or isolated, struggling without help. Even when the work is going well sometimes we can feel this way. A reality of artistic life is that artists can often spend large amounts of time on their own. Plus a common pattern for many people in general is not to ask for help. So, having regular time where support is focused on your goals and aspirations can be really useful in making progress. And, as we are supported we are no longer on our own.

Objective Feedback

Part of how I see the role of an art coach is to provide objective feedback . Sometimes we need someone who is not connected to us in the way that friends, colleagues or family may be, to give us feedback. Art coaching can offer feedback. That can be on patterns and behaviours we are doing. It can also be on things we are not doing. Of course this may not always be entirely comfortable, and it can be very useful to have our habits, perceptions and areas of development highlighted. What is key about this kind of art coaching feedback is that it is given with empathy and support and in the service of supporting the artist being coached, in meeting their goals.

We might not have all the information

Sometimes we might not have all the information, experience or there may be gaps in our skill set. This might be information around techniques, use of materials, artistic or creative processes. It might be about aspects of business. How to make use of social media for example, the best way to approach an art gallery. Or it might be about psychology – why we feel dissatisfied with our work, struggling to find our voice or anxious about what others might think of our work.

Another person who has travelled the path before us may have information that is useful to us, Art coaching can point us in the direction of resources we were not aware of. An artistic coach may have knowledge and skills we can draw on. Or be able to help us recognise where self-limiting beliefs are hampering our success.

Critique and Evaluation

An art coach can support to help us see our strengths and discover our learning edges. Too often we can be self critical which is not useful in evaluating work and deciding what to do next (see my post on the inner critic). Having someone alongside us to help with critique rather than criticism can help in the process of learning, exploring and finding our voice.

Coaching has an element of expertise about psychological goal setting and how to achieve our aims. Having access to theory about human nature can help us understand ourselves better, have a more effective relationship with ourselves so get what we need for ourselves.

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My approach to art coaching is based in Transactional Analysis. I have been working with people in the field of personal development for over 15 years. Sessions can be online or at my office in Buxton.

Interested in finding out more? Book in for a free 20 minute chemistry chat. A chance to find out about each other and whether we might work together.