This Week Colour

If last week was all about value, then this week has been all about colour.

After a few months of consolidation I feel like I am in the middle of another period of development in my art practice.  I’ve been aware over the last three months or so that I’ve not been as keen to go into the studio, the work hasn’t been flowing quite as easily and I’ve been feeling slightly dissatisfied with the paintings I have been making.   Reflecting on this, it seems that I’ve not been that excited by what I have been making. It hasn’t felt that new, but more of a variation on a theme that began about a year ago.   And I haven’t quite known how to change that.

So I have been thinking, and painting and getting feedback, and painting and thinking some more.  And then I watched one of Nicholas Wilton’s short videos on Colour and something clicked.  I already had knowledge and awareness of how to de-saturate colour to reduce it’s intensity.  As we do this the colours adjacent will then be seen with greater contrast. But like many things that are part of ongoing learning and development we can come at something we think we already know and with a new context experience it differently.  We can find a different perspective and discover something new or that we hadn’t quite grasped.  Sometimes we experience a greater level of understanding and integration.  So, the video was something of a light bulb moment as several things fell into place and I understood why I’d not been liking my work.  I began to get some ideas about how to change it.

Working with Limited Palette

Firstly I had been working with limited palettes. Generally no more than three colours, with variations of light and dark.

I had also been wanting to bring in a sense of space and simplicity to the design of my work.  But because the colours were so limited, the paintings were feeling too simple. As a result I was then using lots of texture to compensate and create more interest.  Resulting in work that was beginning to feel the same or certainly very similar.

When I did use more colours, because I was working with paint that was only slightly de-saturated the work would feel garish.  And rather than think to de-saturate the colour further,  I would paint over it and go back to the limited palette. And round again.,

 

So, armed with a greater understanding  I have playing with de-saturating colour and it has felt very different. I think  I have a lot still to learn about how to do this, make it work effectively with how I paint. Design takes on a whole new set of exciting challenges.  I definitely feel a sense of lightness and space that wasn’t so easy to attain before.  And I am experimenting in new ways with new ideas.

Does this experience sound familiar to you?  Have you found something in your art practice that you revisit and gain new understanding each time?

Useful Links

See some of my work at the Chatsworth Exhibition during January and February with Peak District Artisans.

Sign up for my email challenge which has a exercises all geared to support you in boosting your artistic confidence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s All About Value

Maybe “its all about value” is something of an exaggeration. However there is some truth in the fact that value, the relative light and darkness of a composition is key in making impactful and successful work.

Evaluating Work

I had an interesting experience and some very useful learning on this subject in the last couple of days or so. If you read my blog you will know I did a 12 week online course at the beginning of last year with Nicholas Wilton .  The course had a huge impact on my painting. Nick talks a lot about how important value is to design. In fact the first few weeks of the course are spent looking at this. And he stresses that it is one of the first areas to consider in evaluating work.

Recently I had nearly completed a couple of paintings and had posted them for feedback in a group I am part of. I received some very helpful comments that were mainly about value. That in both of the paintings the suggestions were to review values and look to increase the differences in the light and dark. I found myself feeling really resistant to making changes. Afterwards I understood that it was  because I had an idea in mind I wanted to pursue and I was unwilling to let go of it. It took a chat to a friend and fellow artist who has lot of experience in design to bottom out my resistance.  Our conversation was all about how sometimes,  no matter how much you may want to include something in a piece of art or design, you may just have to let it go and move on.

Review in Greyscale

So my moving on process involved printing of a value scale.  I realised that had not been checking values in my work often enough. Lesson number 352 in remembering to so this on a regular basis from now on. I looked at the piece again and really considered the values in it. As I did this I realised that I had, without really considering it, made a painting that was quite dark,  as the differences in value were negligible. If you look at the two images above you can see what I mean. Looking  at the version in grey scale, then it is mostly a work in the 5 – 10 range.  It doesn’t  stimulate the eye with contrast and difference.  Because the grey is a dark grey the black shapes do not stand out as much as they would if the grey was much lighter.

What about the learning points? I have a habit of painting dark and I need to keep a value scale to hand to help me with this for while. I’ve gotten into the habit of not checking often enough.

Do not fall in love too soon (again) Click to see my other post on this. And be prepared to give up something. Or maybe find a way to scratch that creative itch in another way.

Feeling resistant?  Don’t ignore it. Explore it and see what this might be about as there is probably some useful learning to be had from your resistance.

What tools do you find most helpful in your work?  Have you had a similar experience?  How did you resolve it?

 

 

Digging Deep – My Inspiration

Digging Deep
Digging Deep Mixed media on cradled panel. Framed. 12×12″

Landscape, history and archaeology inspire me. I am fascinated by what has gone before.  I also love walking and exploring.  A few years ago I had occasion to spend some time on the south coat down in Dorset.  We were staying in Weymouth with a group of scuba diving friends.  I’d go on long walks along the cliffs with my dogs, while my friends were off exploring underwater.  As I am much more of a warm water person, the diving was not for me, being too deep and dark to interest me.  On these trips I was more interested in seeing what was above the surface of the sea and spent my days exploring the coastline.

Walking Portland

One of the walks I enjoyed was on Portland.  Portland is an island near Weymouth.  Four miles in length, it has three light houses and numerous quarries for the limestone used by Christopher Wren in the building of St Paul’s cathedral.  As a result, the coastline of Portland is very interesting. Not only are there a series of low cliffs and small bays along the coast, but also industrial archaeology. Circumnavigating Portland was one of the many walks in the area I enjoyed.   I can remember absolutely blazing hot sunny days when I was very grateful for a cooling breeze off the sea and lots of chances to paddle and cool off.

On the walk I came across a tangle of metal cables, a beam and ironwork on the cliff edge.  Research following the walk explained it was called Red Crane, used to lower boats into the water.  With this information my imagination took flight.  Fed during childhood and adolescence on a steady diet of Georgette Heyer, Thomas Hardy, Jane Austen, Daphne Du Maurier,  I like to wonder about  the people living in cottages along the coast.  How they lived, worked and died. I’m endlessly fascinated to see the signs and marks they have left behind them.  It may be in the ridges in a field suggesting a medieval field boundary or like the crane sitting on the cliff edge, above the sea on Portland.

Inspiration

It is these experiences that inspire my work. My visits to Dorset took place about eight or nine years ago. When I was painting Digging Deep I didn’t have an idea of the crane on that hot summer’s day in mind.  The industrial shapes only emerged during the process of the work towards the end.  I work intuitively applying paint, making marks, experimenting with texture, surface and colour until something catches my interest.  Then I want to develop it further. The lines and marks at the top of the painting, reminiscent of industrial archaeology, caught my attention.  From there the work became about land, excavation and edges.

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Digging Deep – an earlier version.

I think in the case of this work the title Digging Deep is also a metaphor for the experience of completing the painting.   This piece has had several iterations. I had worked on it over several months, finding and discarding ideas throughout that process. There were a couple of times when I thought it was finished. And then decided that maybe it wasn’t. Sometimes we fall in love too soon with an idea and do not give ourselves the space to dig deep to find what else there might be to express.   If I continue with the metaphor of digging deep within, then I think this piece also reflects how as artists we might need to dig deep within ourselves to find confidence to continue, to find energy, inspiration, motivation and ideas.

How does your inspiration show itself in your work?  I’d love to hear from you.

How to Choose an Art Coach

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Photo by energepic.com on Pexels.com

My top five suggestions for how to choose an art coach.

Chemistry Check

Chemistry is probably one of the most important aspects of how to choose a coach. You will want to click with the person you are working with. You will also want to feel confident in their skills,experience, and knowledge. Some ways to check this out are to do some research along with meeting them before you begin to work together.  You can look to see if they have a blog? How they write can be a helpful way of understanding their thinking. Can you find them on line? Are there Facebook, YouTube or Instagram videos of them speaking. This will give you in insight into their personality. You can also ask for a trial or a chemistry check where you get the chance to do some work first before committing. It may only be a half hour but it can give a feel for what it might be like to work with the person.

Psychological Safety

The most effective coaching is when we feel able to talk about the things we are not doing well so that we can be helped. To do that we need to feel psychologically safe. In other words, we need to know that what we are sharing will be kept confidential. That we can reveal our vulnerabilities and be treated with respect, without judgement or criticism and be supported. We need to know that the person will help to support our self esteem.

So, feeling psychologically safe is an important part of how to choose an art coach. Do you feel comfortable, supported and safe. Because psychological safety is hugely important if we are going to be vulnerable. If we don’t feel safe enough to be vulnerable then learning will not take place. How can we tell if the coach we are thinking of working with will be the kind of person we can trust with our psychological safety? The same mechanisms I suggested for the chemistry check can be useful. Do they seem like a person with integrity. Do they meet their agreements, including the small ones? Are they clear in their communication with you? These aren’t acid tests and they will give you a sense of the person’s approach, attitude and way of working.

What Coaching Experience do they have?

A good question to ask is to find out about what experience the person has. They may not have direct experience of coaching, they might have experience in teaching or in other related areas which can be equally relevant. Some experience of working with people in a one to one coaching or teaching capacity is important because they need to know how to give feedback in a positive, clear and constructive fashion. They also will need to understand how to structure a session, set goals for the session and know how to facilitate and coach rather than advise. A good coach will rarely tell you what to do, although they might sometimes make suggestions. Mostly what they will be doing is facilitating your thinking and exploration, helping you find the answers for yourself.

Coaching Models

You will also want to work with someone who has some training in coaching or adult learning. Training will provide ways for them to think about the how to coach effectively. It will also mean that they will recognise when something is beyond them. It is important for a coach to know when they reached their limitations. Or to know when not to open up work when they do not the skills to deal with something.  My model of coaching is transactional analysis which has lots of ways of thinking about personal psychology and  communication.

A straightforward way to find this out is to ask what models they use. A good coach will be able to describe how they work and the principles they use.

Referrals and Recommendations

Finally another piece of information to gather in how to choose an art coach is to ask people you know and trust for a referral to someone they might have worked with or know. You can also ask people you are considering working with if they have any testimonials that you can read on previous work they have done.  If  other people have has a positive experience this can help you in your decision making.

I offer coaching from meeting rooms in Buxton and Stockport or online using Zoom.  Click here to find out more about how I work as a coach.

Have you worked with an art coach?  How did you go about making your decision?

 

24 Hour Sale

Exciting News! I will be doing a Facebook Live Sale on Monday 10th December at 6.30pm. I will have some of my prints, my boxed notecards and even some original paintings in the sale. I am offering a 25% reduction on the usual price and P&P is included. The sale will last until 6.30pm (uk time) on Tuesday. With plenty of time for posting before Christmas this could be your opportunity to grab a pre-Christmas bargain and give an unusual and original gift to someone special.

I have a selection of abstract and impressionistic landscape prints that will be included in this 24 Hour Sale. I will be selecting from the recent colour studies and including some of these along with two of my larger works on wooden cradled panel. Along with prints and originals both my new Abstract and the Flowers and Fields card sets are included as smaller gift options.

Message me on the day to reserve your choice and items will be allocated on a first come first served basis.

Why Buy Original Art?

So, what is the point of buying an original piece of art? When you can probably get something much cheaper from (insert name of the home or furniture store of choice) and it can be changed as you update your paint colour.

I’d like to share a different perspective. Original art is not just for the investors. In fact I think the vast majority of original art is probably bought from established or up and coming artists like me and my fellow artists for tens or hundred of pounds, rather than thousands of pounds. Probably from small local galleries, local and regional art fairs, open studios and directly from the artists themselves.

What are you getting in buying a piece of original art? You have the opportunity to own something unique that is completely original. Not just that, in the creation of the piece the artist has had a relationship with that piece of work. They have applied the paint and materials or melted the metal, worked the clay, carved the wood, blown the glass. If you are buying directly from the artist you can often talk to them and find out about them.  Learn what inspired them, hear the story of the creation of the work and even why the artist made the choices they did in the making.  In owning the piece you are gifted with the unique experience of owning a creative representation of someone’s perspective on the world.

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Colour Study, mounted. £30 in my Etsy shop.

You can start small. Lots of artists will make their sketches or smaller works available for sale. These can be a great way to start your original art collection.  For example I have done a couple of projects this year in support of my art practice one was the 100 Day Challenge where I did a small abstract collage a day. This inspired some small collage works on paper.  The second was an exercise shared by Louise Fletcher which resulted in a whole host of small colour studies. These works are all available in my Etsy shop for under £40.  You might also like to check out Alice Sheridan’s recent post on this topic, Alice has some good tips about how to decide what to buy.

Choosing a piece of original art allows us to connect with our own inspiration and the things that move us.  We have the chance own original work that appeals to us deeply. Sometimes we will not know why we like something just that there is something about it that appeals to us.   We may not even be able to put it into words. I think these kind of experiences are worth having. To sit in front of a piece of art that brings you pleasure year after year, to be moved and inspired.

How did you begin collecting original art?  What was your first piece? Do you still love it?  I’d love to hear your experiences.

 

 

 

 

Build Your Confidence Challenge

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Are you thinking that you might be interested in building your confidence as an artist? In my experience confidence is often based on how we account what we are good at, how much our self-limiting beliefs and critical inner dialogue affects us, how we prioritise ourselves and our work, and how effective we are at getting the feedback we need to support ourselves. Building on my recent post about Supporting your Artist Mindset, with these things in mind I have devised a six week challenge with a question or task each week for you to consider, think and journal about and which you might find helpful in building more confidence. There is plenty of time between each email for the task and to reflect on the changes you are making.

I will be posting a series of questions or tasks each week for the next six weeks, taking a week off at Christmas. If you are interested, and to make sure you don’t miss a post, then sign up to my newsletter list here to ensure it comes directly to your inbox. The first email will come out after you sign up for the challenge.

And do let me know how you get on, I love to hear about people’s progress, learning and success. Have fun and happy painting.

Sign up for the 6 week email confidence boosting challenge.

Sticking to the knitting – or how to build an arts business

Copy of Copy of Anika Kohler (1)I wanted a comparable arty phrase but couldn’t come up with one, so sticking to the knitting it had to be.  What am I talking about?  Being focused and keeping with a plan, or how I have gone about building an arts business.

I’m an emerging artist.  I have been a painting for about eight years and intermittently showing my work for the last three or four years. I’ve sold some paintings and run some workshops.  I’ve had some very small success.

Early this year, as lots of you will know if you read my blog, I completed the Creative Visionary Path with Nicholas Wilton and  I found my artistic voice.  Which has been incredibly exciting.  As a result I also felt readier than I ever had to start putting myself out there, hopefully selling work and building a profile as an artist.

I had set up some decent support for myself with an occasional Virtual Assistant to help with admin,  I’ve just appointed a bookkeeper and although I have a sales and marketing background, I also have a marketing support person to bounce ideas off and to share the workload.

Very quickly I found myself with so many opportunities I could potentially pursue.  Because I’m already a therapist and teacher I could see the possibility to bring some of my teaching and psychological work into my art.  I could develop my art workshops and offer coaching for artists.

However,  it was during one of the conversations with Fiona (my marketing support) as I was considering these options that I realised needed a clear plan otherwise I could just get completely overwhelmed, run around doing nothing very effectively and end up feeling disheartened and demotivated with my lack of progress and success.

Screenshot_20181116-133955My focus was and is my art. I want to paint. Workshops and coaching are great and I love doing that kind of work. But for now because I am an emerging artist with, as yet, a fairly small audience of interested people I need to focus on making work.  Continuing on this path of exploring and developing my authentic voice, now that I have found it, and getting that work out into the public. I decided that people would be interested in my workshops and coaching organically from seeing my work, my posting on social media, and my writing and talking about art and creativity. So, that’s what I have been doing and it has been paying off.

Since completing CVP earlier this year I have held a pop up shop, exhibited at Derbyshire Open Arts, Art in the Pen at Skipton and twice in Buxton.

I have run two art workshops, demonstrated at a local art group and had a people begin coaching with me.

I have been invited to provide work to a gallery Number Four in St Abbs and applied and been invited to join Peak District Artisans.

I’m beginning next year’s planning and it will be similar to this year. I will be exhibiting at some key events in the local art calendar.   Derbyshire Open Arts, some of the Artist and Designer Fairs in Buxton, the Great Dome Art Fair.  The earliest chance next year to see my work will be at the Chatsworth Exhibition in the Stables from 10th January to 28th February 2019 with Peak District Artisans.

What else?  I am running two workshops this year focused on abstract art .  An Introduction to Abstract Art and, a follow on and more advanced day, Colour, Collage and Texture in Abstract Painting.  I’m open for more coaching work which can be online,  or in person in Buxton.

So this year has been all about sticking to the knitting, having a plan and seeing it through. I’m delighted with how it’s gone and I’m eager and looking forward to more.  Are there any “how to’s” from this?  Here’s my top five:

  1. Decide on what your focus needs to be, mine was making art and getting it out there.
  2. Develop a plan of activity to support your focus. In the main don’t do anything that takes you away from this.
  3. Delegate and outsource. If you can find someone to do a tasks either quicker or, at less than it costs you to do it yourself, then outsource.
  4. Follow up, follow up, follow up.  From little acorns etc. Make a note of every interaction that has potential and follow it up. If not now, then maybe at some point in the future.
  5. Recognise and celebrate every success.  You deserve it!

Has this year gone as you hoped?  What are your success stories? With hindsight would you have done anything different?

I’d love to hear from you and of course if you are around do drop into the Octagon in Buxton between Friday 23rd and Sunday the 25th November for a chat.  I will have lots of smaller works, prints and boxed notecards with me that make great Christmas gifts.

On Capacity and Connectedness

This post is about some discoveries about capacity and connectedness that emerged from a recent period of struggling to paint.

I’ve been having a tough few weeks. My art; often a refuge, delight and source of energy has not been going well. I have been feeling frustrated, irritable, comparing my work to others and feeling self critical. As a therapist and coach I recognise this as being in a defensive pattern because I am feeling vulnerable.  I am feeling vulnerable because there is a lot going on in my life at the moment, both good and not so great.  Across all areas of my work I have been very busy.  We have had really successful start to the year in my psychotherapy training business (TA Training Organisation).  In my art a new gallery,  Number Four Gallery in St Abbs, have taken eight pieces of work for their Christmas Show. I have been accepted to join Peak District Artisans. I exhibited at the local Artist and Designer Fair in Buxton.

However, in the midst of these positive events, there have also been some difficult things happening that are affecting me emotionally and psychologically. So I have retreated from myself and others in a protective way that is an old unhelpful pattern. Which brings me to the point of this post and the learning I’ve gained from this experience.

So, what is the learning I’m wanting to share?

Firstly about connection. If we are making authentic art this is an expression of part of self. Then it seems to follow if we are not fully connected to ourselves we will be disconnected from our art.  As I think back over the last couple of months this is what I have been experiencing.  In my art making, in the studio in front of the painting, I was going outwards to what others were doing and looking to repeat what I had already done, rather than looking inwards at what I felt inspired to do. My choice of colour, mark making and ways of painting were not what I truly felt in the moment because being disconnected from myself meant I was disconnected from what I felt.  How important it is then to our art making to stay connected to ourselves and the personal choices we want to make.

Secondly scaling up and scaling down.

During this period the only thing that felt “like me” were some colour studies I was working on.  Using an exercise from Louise Fletcher fellow artist, (see Louise in This Painting Life on Facebook) I had about 15 different small colour studies I was playing with. What I was noticing was that the bigger works (a couple of 20×20 inch paintings)  were not resolving themselves.  Again, on reflection, I can see that it was almost as though I didn’t have the capacity to do anything bigger.  That not only does making bigger work require us to scale up in terms of the tools,  materials and composition, it also requires us up to scale up in terms of our process as well.  Being able to hold and contain the experience of something bigger takes capacity.  For larger work to be successful it needs to feel integrated as a whole rather than something that is almost a collection of smaller works on a bigger canvas.  So in the process of making larger works the artist needs to have creative energetic capacity to conceptualise the whole.  Which is not about planning the outcome but more about having mental space and energy for the art-making process.

Are there any useful “how to’s” from this experience? Well for me a recognition that I have a busy life and so there will be times when I don’t have capacity for major works. When that happens it’s ok, and that art making can still happen, just on smaller scale. The “how to” from this is acceptance of personal limitations.

Does this tally with your experience of moving between larger and smaller works?  I’d love to hear how you maintain your connectedness?

All colour studies will be available to buy at my next exhibition in Buxton at the Pavilion Gardens on Friday 23rd, Saturday 24th adn Sunday 25th of November.

My Artist Journey

I enjoyed art at school. There, my main interest was ceramics. I would spend a lot of my breaks and lunchtime working in the pottery room as for me, it was a haven, as I didn’t particularly enjoy school. I came back to art about 9 years ago. I had completed my training to work as a psychotherapist and wanted something to help me relax and to be creative in a different way. I began with a basic course run as part of the local authority’s adult education programme. I had made a start towards something new. The course was pretty basic; however it got me touch with art materials again.

Landscape Oil Painting

An early oil painting.

The next significant moment was an oil painting workshop with Imogen Bone while I was holiday on the Isles of Scilly. Imogen is a good teacher and a modern impressionistic landscape painter. This was a transformative experience as I realised I could paint. I came back home all fired up and eager to continue exploring landscape painting in oils.

An early acrylic painting.

At the same time as painting I was visiting art galleries when I could, researching different artists I wanted to work with along with experimenting and trying new materials. The next two or three years saw considerable exploration. One of the best teachers I met was Carol Baker who runs a whole series of workshops on loosening up and working with acrylics. At this stage in my journey I was definitely still learning about the materials and how to paint in a loose representational style. I was pleased with my work and began to show it in a small way in open studios and a couple of small galleries/ cafes that took a few paintings. My relatives all got paintings for Christmas and I sold a few pieces.

Mixed Media and Abstract Painting

The exploration continued. I learnt about using watercolour. I found the work of Jean Haines and Ann Blockley. Their lovely books inspired me and I began to experiment with mixing media; at this stage mostly ink, watercolour, gouache. I had a tentative play with collage.

Exploring abstraction.

The next big thing was finding the work of Jane Davies, an American abstract artist on YouTube. Jane was my introduction to abstract work. She has a ton of free videos on her website and also offers a series of online courses. I signed up for a few of these and found them really helpful on learning yet more about mixing media with acrylics and abstract composition, a completely new direction. As I began to paint abstractly, I really began to feel and see that my work was derivative; my version of someone else’s style. This was something I struggled with for some time. Looking back I can see that up to this point my explorations had been mostly learning about materials and techniques. The area that I had not explored, probably because I was not yet ready to do so, was artistic process. How I go about making my art. Partly the things that inspire me, that I draw on in making my art. But also the process of making my art. What do I mean by this? I’m referring to how I begin, the steps from beginning through the making of the work. The decisions and choices I make during the process. How I complete and finish a piece.

Intuitive Painting

This brings me to Art2Life, Nicholas Wilton and Creative Visionary Path. This is a 12 week online development programme for artists. It was the big break though I needed. The course is a mixture of technical principles about how to make authentic work, and guidance and coaching on ways of understanding one’s own process in that making.

So I now know that my work is intuitive. I have no idea what is going to emerge when I begin to paint, it’s a process of play, exploration and response in the moment to what I am seeing and experiencing. Sometimes the work is about a memory, of landscape, a form or shape in nature or something created by people. Sometimes it is about the process of making. It’s an adventure and a journey that is continually exciting. What next? The exploration continues. I feel like I am at the beginning of a new phase. That while I’m confident I’ve found my form of artistic expression, I am now engaged in an ongoing process of change and development.

What were the big breakthroughs in your artistic journey? How did you find your voice?

I’d love to hear your stories.